Green jobs

  • Antuän / Flickr
  • Curt Carnemark / World Bank
  • Yann Gar/Flickr
  • Danilo Pinzon / World Bank
  • Tran Thi Hoa / World Bank
  • Graham Crouch / World Bank
  • Wu Zhiyi / World Bank
  • Danilo Pinzon / World Bank
Green jobs are central to sustainable development and respond to the global challenges of environmental protection, economic development and social inclusion. By engaging governments, workers and employers as active agents of change, the ILO promotes the greening of enterprises, workplace practices and the labour market as a whole. These efforts create decent employment opportunities, enhance resource efficiency and build low-carbon sustainable societies.

Latest

  1. © Lakshman Nadaraja/World Bank 2016

    Event

    Gender and Climate Change Financing - Why does it matter for Employment, Women's Empowerment and Social Equity Prospects?

    This event is organized within the framework of ILO's Green Centenary Initiative and Women at Work Centenary Initiative.

  2. © www.usa-reiseblogger.de 2016

    World Environment Day 2016

    Preserve the environment to boost development and provide jobs

    05 June 2016

    Illegal wildlife trade harms not only the environment, it risks jobs, development and livelihoods, says ILO Director-General Guy Ryder, on World Environment Day

Highlight

  1. Training

    Academy on the Green Economy



    Registration is now open for the second edition of this global academy organized within the framework of PAGE. 

    When: 3- 14 October 2016
    Where: ITC-ILO, Turin (Italy)

Publications

  1. Green Jobs Assessment: Uruguay

    This report presents an estimation on the current number of green jobs, their contribution to GDP and also also assesses the working conditions of economic activities classified as green in Uruguay.

Projects and activities

  1. ILO's support worldwide:

  • The role the ILO must take up is to promote the considerable potential for creation of decent work associated with the transition to a low-carbon sustainable development path and to minimize and manage the inevitable dislocation that will accompany it."

    Guy Ryder, ILO Director-General